Pornography is Addictive

What are “triggers?”

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Triggers are catalysts that create a need/desire to act out sexually. Most often, triggers are some sort of “pain agent.” Pain agents include both emotional and physical discomfort, either short- or long-term. Depression, anxiety, loneliness, boredom, stress, shame, anger and any other form of emotional or psychological (or even physical) discomfort can easily trigger an addict’s desire to escape, avoid and dissociate. Positive agents can also serve as triggers. So if a sex addict gets fired from his or her job, he or she will want to act out sexually; and if that same addict gets a great new job, he or she will want act out sexually. If triggers are not dealt with in a healthy way (dissipated via a healthy, non-addictive coping mechanism like talking to supportive friends, family members or a therapist), then the addictive cycle inevitably progresses.

Triggers: What to Look For

Generally speaking, triggers for porn addiction fall into two main categories – internal and external.

  • Internal triggers for porn addiction typically involve emotional (or sometimes physical) discomfort. In other words, depression, shame, anxiety, anger, fear, guilt, remorse, boredom and/or any other uncomfortable emotion can trigger a desire to look at porn.
  • External triggers for porn addiction typically involve people, places, things and/or events. For instance, if/when a sex addict sees a sexy coworker or a lingerie catalog (or anything else that reminds the addict of sex), he or she might also feel a desire to look at porn.

Sometimes triggers for porn addiction are both internal and external at the same time. In other words, a porn addict might have a tough day at work (an external trigger) that causes feelings of shame (an internal trigger), with both triggers creating a desire to look at porn. And this double whammy can easily be exacerbated by other triggers, such as noticing a sexy billboard on the way home.

A few of the more common internal triggers for porn addiction are:

  • Boredom
  • Loneliness
  • Anger
  • Resentments
  • Fear
  • Anxiety
  • Sadness, grief and/or depression
  • Stress
  • Shame
  • Frustration
  • Feeling unloved and/or unwanted
  • Feeling unappreciated

A few of the more common external triggers for porn addiction are:

  • Travel (especially solo travel)
  • Ended relationships
  • Unstructured time alone
  • Negative experiences (of any type)
  • Positive experiences (of any type)
  • Unexpected life changes (of any type)
  • Substance use or abuse
  • Unexpected exposure to sexual stimuli (driving past a strip club, seeing a sexy magazine at the newsstand, encountering an attractive person, etc.)
  • Financial problems
  • Arguments
  • Family issues

So triggers are tricky little things. And, unfortunately, they are pretty much unavoidable. This is true for all addicts, not just porn addicts. Alcoholics can be triggered when they drive past the local bar. Drug addicts can be triggered when they watch TV crime dramas where drugs are part of the plot. Gambling addicts can be triggered when they see a deck of cards or a set of dice. And addicts of all types – including porn addicts – can be triggered simply because they must deal with the roller-coaster of life and the emotions it induces. In short, triggers are everywhere, and there is not much that porn addicts can do about that fact beyond learning to recognize when they’ve been triggered and ways to intervene when that occurs.

 

source: https://www.addiction.com/expert-blogs/porn-addicts-do-you-know-what-triggers-your-behavior/

 

PORN IS LIKE A DRUG

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This article is from (fightthenewdrug.org)

PORN IS LIKE A DRUG

On the surface, cocaine and porn don’t seem to have a lot in common. One is purchased
in seedy alleyways; the other is free to download. One habit can get expensive pretty fast, while the other is about the price of a high-speed Internet connection. Besides, Hugh Heffner doesn’t exactly conjure up images of a cartel drug lord.
So where’s the similarity? Inside the brain.

In case you’re not a neurosurgeon, here’s a crash course in how the brain works. Deep inside your brain, there’s something called a “reward pathway.” You’ve got one. Your cat’s got one. For mammals, it comes standard. The reward pathway’s job is to help keep you alive by doing exactly what its name promises: rewards you, or more specifically, rewards you when you do something that promotes life, such as eating food or achieving something you’ve worked hard for. And the way it rewards you is by releasing chemicals in your brain— mainly one called dopamine, but also others like
oxytocin [See page 15 Porn Is a Lie].

Normally, these chemicals are really handy. They help us feel pleasure and to bond with other people, and they motivate us to come back to important activities that make us happy. The problem is, the reward pathway can be hijacked. The way substances like cocaine and opioids make users feel high is by triggering the reward pathway to release unnaturally high levels of dopamine without making the user do any of the work to earn it. Want to guess what else does that? Porn. And that surge of dopamine is causing more than
just feelings. As it goes pulsing through the brain, dopamine helps to create new brain pathways that essentially lead the user back to the behavior that triggered the chemical release. The more a drug user hits up or a porn user looks at porn, the more those pathways get wired into the brain, making it easier and easier for the person to turn back to using, whether they want to or not.

Over time, the constant overload of chemicals causes other brain changes as well. Just like a junkie will eventually require more and more of a drug to get a buzz or even just feel normal, porn users can quickly build up a tolerance as their brains adapt to the high levels of dopamine that porn releases. In other words, even though porn is still releasing dopamine into the brain, the user can’t feel its effects as much. That’s because the brain is trying to protect itself from the overload of dopamine by getting rid of some of its chemical receptors, which act like tiny catcher’s mitts that receive the dopamine released. With fewer receptors, the brain thinks less dopamine is there and the user doesn’t feel as strong a reaction. As a result, they have to find more porn, find it more often, or find a more extreme version—or all three—to generate even more dopamine to feel excited.
And once a porn user becomes accustomed to a brain pulsing with these chemicals, trying to cut back on the habit can lead to withdrawal symptoms, just like with drugs. While people often think of porn as something that’s been around forever, today’s version of porn is a whole new ball game. Thanks to the Internet, porn now mixes the most powerful natural dopamine release the body can produce with a cocktail of other elements—endless novelty, shock, and surprise—all of which increase the dopamine surge. And because Internet porn offers an endless stream of variety, users can flip to a new image every time their high starts to fade, keeping dopamine levels elevated for hours.

Describing porn’s effect to a U.S. Senate committee, Dr. Jeffrey Satinover of Princeton
University said, “It is as though we have devised a form of heroin 100 times more powerful than before, usable in the privacy of one’s own home and injected directly to the brain through the eyes.”

On the surface, cocaine and porn don’t seem to have a lot in common but studies are showing that viewing pornography tricks your brain into releasing the same pleasure chemicals that drugs do. What’s more is your brain actually begins to rewire itself because of this artificial stimulation. It may sound crazy, but it’s true.

KEY TAKEAWAYS
• To your brain, porn has the
same effects as drugs.

• Porn hijacks the reward pathway
in the brain.

• Just like drugs, you build up a
tolerance so you need more porn
for the same effects.

• Withdrawal symptoms can occur
when you try and walk away.
Get the Facts on Pornography © 2013 FIGHT THE NEW DRUG™ WWW.FIGHTTHENEWDRUG.ORG 2
Citations Learn more at http://www.FightTheNewDrug.org
[1] Pitchers, K. K., Vialou, V., Nestler, E. J., Laviolette, S. R., Lehman, M. N., and
Coolen, L. M. (2013). Natural and Drug Rewards Act on Common Neural Plasticity
Mechanisms with DeltaFosB as a Key Mediator. Journal of Neuroscience 33, 8:
3434-3442; Hilton, D. L. (2013). Pornography Addiction—A Supranormal Stimulus
Considered in the Context of Neuroplasticity. Socioaffective Neuroscience &
Psychology 3:20767; Hilton, D. L., and Watts, C. (2011). Pornography Addiction:
A Neuroscience Perspective. Surgical Neurology International, 2: 19. (http://www.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3050060/)
[2] Hilton, D. L., and Watts, C. (2011). Pornography Addiction: A Neuroscience
Perspective. Surgical Neurology International, 2: 19; (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.
gov/pmc/articles/PMC3050060/) Bostwick, J. M. and Bucci, J. E. (2008). Internet
Sex Addiction Treated with Naltrexone. Mayo Clinic Proceedings 83, 2: 226–230;
Nestler, E. J. (2005). Is There a Common Molecular Pathway for Addiction? Nature
Neuroscience 9, 11: 1445–1449; Leshner, A. (1997). Addiction Is a Brain Disease
and It Matters. Science 278: 45–7.
[3] Bostwick, J. M. and Bucci, J. E. (2008). Internet Sex Addiction Treated with
Naltrexone. Mayo Clinic Proceedings 83, 2: 226–230; Balfour, M. E., Yu, L., and
Coolen, L. M. (2004). Sexual Behavior and Sex-Associated Environmental Cues
Activate the Mesolimbic System in Male Rats. Neuropsychopharmacology 29,
4:718–730; Leshner, A. (1997). Addiction Is a Brain Disease and It Matters. Science
278: 45–7.
[4] Hedges, V. L., Chakravarty, S., Nestler, E. J., and Meisel, R. L. (2009). DeltaFosB
Overexpression in the Nucleus Accumbens Enhances Sexual Reward in Female
Syrian Hamsters. Genes Brain and Behavior 8, 4: 442–449; Bostwick, J. M. and
Bucci, J. E. (2008). Internet Sex Addiction Treated with Naltrexone. Mayo Clinic
Proceedings 83, 2: 226–230; Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain That Changes Itself. New
York: Penguin Books, 108; Mick, T. M. and Hollander, E. (2006). Impulsive-Compulsive
Sexual Behavior. CNS Spectrums, 11(12):944-955; Nestler, E. J. (2005).
Is There a Common Molecular Pathway for Addiction? Nature Neuroscience 9,
11: 1445–1449; Leshner, A. (1997). Addiction Is a Brain Disease and It Matters.
Science 278: 45–7.
[5] Bostwick, J. M. and Bucci, J. E. (2008). Internet Sex Addiction Treated with
Naltrexone. Mayo Clinic Proceedings 83, 2: 226–230; Paul, P. (2007). Pornified:
How Pornography Is Transforming Our Lives, Our Relationships, and Our
Families. New York: Henry Hold and Co., 75; Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain That
Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books, 107; What Is Oxytocin, Psychology
Today, http://www.psychologytoday.com/basics/oxytocin
[6] Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain That Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books,
106;
Kauer, J. A., and Malenka, J. C. (2007). Synaptic Plasticity and Addiction. Nature
Reviews Neuroscience 8: 844–858; Mick, T. M. and Hollander, E. (2006). Impulsive-
Compulsive Sexual Behavior. CNS Spectrums, 11(12):944-955; Nestler, E. J.
(2005). Is There a Common Molecular Pathway for Addiction? Nature Neuroscience
9, 11: 1445–1449; Leshner, A. (1997). Addiction Is a Brain Disease and It
Matters. Science 278: 45–7.
[7] Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain That Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books,
106; Nestler, E. J. (2005). Is There a Common Molecular Pathway for Addiction?
Nature Neuroscience 9, 11: 1445–1449.
[8] Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain That Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books,
106;
Nestler, E. J. (2005). Is There a Common Molecular Pathway for Addiction? Nature
Neuroscience 9, 11: 1445–1449.
[9] Hilton, D. L. (2013). Pornography Addiction—A Supranormal Stimulus Considered
in the Context of Neuroplasticity. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology
3:20767; Pitchers, K. K., Vialou, V., Nestler, E. J., Laviolette, S. R., Lehman, M.
N., and Coolen, L. M. (2013). Natural and Drug Rewards Act on Common Neural
Plasticity Mechanisms with DeltaFosB as a Key Mediator. Journal of Neuroscience
33, 8: 3434-3442; Hedges, V. L., Chakravarty, S., Nestler, E. J., and Meisel, R. L.
(2009). DeltaFosB Overexpression in the Nucleus Accumbens Enhances Sexual
Reward in Female Syrian Hamsters. Genes Brain and Behavior 8, 4: 442–449;
Hilton, D. L., and Watts, C. (2011). Pornography Addiction: A Neuroscience Perspective.
Surgical Neurology International, 2: 19; (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
pmc/articles/PMC3050060/)
Miner, M. H., Raymond, N., Mueller, B. A., Lloyd, M., Lim, K. O. (2009). Preliminary
Investigation of the Impulsive and Neuroanatomical Characteristics of
Compulsive Sexual Behavior. Psychiatry Research 174: 146–51; Angres, D. H.
and Bettinardi-Angres, K. (2008). The Disease of Addiction: Origins, Treatment,
and Recovery. Disease-a-Month 54: 696–721; Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain That
Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books, 107.
[10] Angres, D. H. and Bettinardi-Angres, K. (2008). The Disease of Addiction:
Origins, Treatment, and Recovery. Disease-a-Month 54: 696–721; Doidge, N.
(2007). The Brain That Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books, 102.
[11] Pitchers, K. K., Vialou, V., Nestler, E. J., Laviolette, S. R., Lehman, M. N.,
and Coolen, L. M. (2013). Natural and Drug Rewards Act on Common Neural
Plasticity Mechanisms with DeltaFosB as a Key Mediator. Journal of Neuroscience
33, 8: 3434-3442; Angres, D. H. and Bettinardi-Angres, K. (2008). The Disease
of Addiction: Origins, Treatment, and Recovery. Disease-a-Month 54: 696–721;
Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain That Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books, 105;
Paul, P. (2007). Pornified: How Pornography Is Transforming Our Lives, Our
Relationships, and Our Families. New York: Henry Hold and Co., 75.
[12] Hilton, D. L., and Watts, C. (2011). Pornography Addiction: A Neuroscience
Perspective. Surgical Neurology International, 2: 19; (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.
gov/pmc/articles/PMC3050060/) Angres, D. H. and Bettinardi-Angres, K. (2008).
The Disease of Addiction: Origins, Treatment, and Recovery. Disease-a-Month 54:
696–721.
[13] Angres, D. H. and Bettinardi-Angres, K. (2008). The Disease of Addiction:
Origins, Treatment, and Recovery. Disease-a-Month 54: 696–721; Zillmann, D.
(2000). Influence of Unrestrained Access to Erotica on Adolescents’ and Young
Adults’ Dispositions Toward Sexuality. Journal of Adolescent Health 27, 2: 41–44.
[14] Angres, D. H. and Bettinardi-Angres, K. (2008). The Disease of Addiction:
Origins, Treatment, and Recovery. Disease-a-Month 54: 696–721; Berridge, K. C.
and Robinson, T. E. (2002). The Mind of an Addicted Brain: Neural Sensitization
of Wanting Versus Liking. In J. T. Cacioppo, G. G. Bernston, R. Adolphs, et al.
(Eds.) Foundations in Social Neuroscience (pp. 565–72). Cambridge, Mass.: MIT
Press.
[15] Paul, P. (2007). Pornified: How Pornography Is Transforming Our Lives, Our
Relationships, and Our Families. New York: Henry Hold and Co., 75; Caro, M.
(2004). The New Skin Trade. Chicago Tribune, September 19; Brosius, H. B., et al.
(1993). Exploring the Social and Sexual “Reality” of Contemporary Pornography.
Journal of Sex Research 30, 2: 161–70.
[16] Satinover, J. (2004). Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation,
Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space, Hearing on the Brain
Science Behind Pornography Addiction and Effects of Addiction on Families and
Communities, November 18.

Source of arcticle:  http://fightthenewdrug.org/porn-addiction-escalates/

 

5 Stages of Pornography Addiction

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**this article originally appeared here:  http://newsok.com/article/5407775

About 83 percent of pornography addicts are men, and one in three is a woman. The largest users of online pornography are 12 to 17-year-olds. Teenagers. Fifty-six percent of divorces involve one spouse with a pornography addiction (mind-armor.com). Yes, addiction—not just viewing for recreational pleasure, but viewing it because it becomes a compulsion and the addict can’t think of or do anything else.

Do you think you, your spouse, or someone else you know might be addicted to pornography?  Read below about the five stages of a pornography addiction.

STAGE 1. Early exposure. As was stated, the largest users of online porn are children ages twelve to seventeen. Most boys have a curiosity about the opposite sex and, unfortunately, think they can learn more about them on Internet porn sites. They yield to the enticement offered by non-human, unemotional contact. Unless they can navigate away from this temptation, they are seduced. There are new statistics that teenage boys are being diagnosed with erectile dysfunction due to advanced pornography abuse.

STAGE 2. Addiction. Addiction takes place when the initial naïve curiosity turns into a physical dependence for this degenerate type of sexual arousal. In a pornography addiction, the habit-forming “substance” is explicit sexual material. To satisfy the addiction, the addict relies on the Internet, DVDs, uses his smartphone or looks at magazines or books.

Using porn increases to more than recreational exploit. The addict loses control of his or her thoughts in pursuit of the drug. The images establish themselves in the brain and are hard to shake for visually-wired males. Porn is needed for arousal and is used on a regular basis. Instead of a vein or a lung, the substance is taken in via the eyes directly to the visual cortex in the back of the brain, releasing neurochemicals like dopamine and endorphins, producing a “high.” All addictions share the same brain changes.

“Constant novelty, at the click of a mouse, can cause addiction,” said Gary Wilson of TEDx, in “The Great Porn Experiment.” Dopamine rewards you for seeking the visual pleasures porn presents. It makes you feel good. The brain chemicals motivate some to repeat this behavior. You keep coming back. You can’t stop. You’re hooked. Because of this chemical release — and the consequences of behavior — pornography addiction is considered to be a form of chemical brain damage. People become dependent on pornography for physical and emotional satisfaction.

STAGE 3. Desensitization. Just as in any chemical dependency, the amount of pornography the addict previously used is not enough to stimulate these brain chemicals. Dopamine loves novelty. When the reward wears off, the dopamine release declines, therefore pleasure declines, the libido declines, and may cause erectile dysfunction in males. Less gratification leads to the desire for greater amounts of hardcore porn. A vicious cycle reigns. Addicts need to intensify reaching the pleasure points in their brains again, only on a more advanced level.

STAGE 4. Escalation. The addict desires greater pleasure, expanded novelty, so he or she ups the dose. They pursue pernicious, indecent images from the Internet. Porn has become their drug of choice, and self-medication rises to new levels. Licentious sexual images, urges and fantasies dominate the thoughts. This over-stimulation interferes with the normal balance of the addict’s brain chemicals. They now crave extreme novelty. Most viewing is done in secret.

STAGE 5. Acting out sexually. Acting out is the next stage of escalation. The addict moves from viewing pornography to seeking a real world experience. It leads to risky behaviors, like stealing from joint bank accounts to pay for prostitutes, binge drinking for heightened courage to act out, unexplained anger or promiscuous sex. The latter may, and does, cause STDs (Sexually Transmitted Diseases). Leaving their boring spouses behind, who long ago failed to fulfill sexual gratification, addicted men and women actively seek other live sex partners. If married, the addict will think nothing of committing adultery to satiate the craving for intense sexual novelty. Men will visit prostitutes, women will pick up men in bars or at the gym, or resort to cyber porn (including email, chat rooms, and social media). Chatting with strangers who vicariously satisfy sexual needs behind closed doors is adultery—ask any spouse who is victim of their partner’s porn addiction and has acted out in the cyber world. It’s emotional adultery and may lead to acting out with live partners.

Depending on the level of graphic, hardcore porn the addict has viewed in order to spiral to the acting out level, some escalate to the deviant sexual behaviors and perversions of rape, child molestation, incest and even murder. Pornography could be considered a gateway drug to severe criminal behaviors.

In Ted Bundy’s final interview on the day of his execution, James Dobson uncovered the knowledge that the impetus of this serial killer’s criminal rampage began with an addiction to pornography which escalated to acting out.

A pornography addiction is about selfishness—getting, taking—not giving, as it would be in a normal intimate relationship with a spouse. The addiction makes it impossible for any emotional or marital familiarity, closeness or love.

The admission of addiction and desire to be rid of it is the beginning of recovery. It’s the beginning of renewal, mending of self and relationships. In a perfect world, the addict will crave freedom from the addiction and seek help.

For more information about pornography addiction and recovery:

“Taking the power away from porn—for good.”

Fight the new drug

Morality in Media/Porn Harms

Porn is Addictive…Science says so.

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It wasn’t very long ago that doctors and researchers believed that in order for something to be addictive, it had to involve an outside substance that you physically put into your body, like cigarettes, alcohol, or drugs.

Pornographers promise healthy pleasure and relief from sexual tension, but what they often deliver is an addiction, tolerance, and an eventual decrease in pleasure.

—Norman Doidge, MD, The Brain That Changes Itself [1]

It wasn’t very long ago that doctors and researchers believed that in order for something to be addictive, it had to involve an outside substance that you physically put into your body, like cigarettes, alcohol, or drugs. [2]

Once we got a peek into the brain, however, our understanding of how addictions work changed. [3] It turns out, cigarettes, alcohol, and drugs have more in common than you might think. Sure, on the outside, some are poured into a glass while others are lit on fire and smoked. But once they’re in the body, they all do the same thing to the brain: flood it with a chemical called dopamine. [4] That’s what makes them addictive. And porn does the exact same thing. [5]

You see, your brain comes equipped with something called a “reward pathway.” [6] Its job is to motivate you to do things that keep you and your genes alive—things like eating or having sex to produce babies. [7] The way it rewards you is by releasing dopamine into your brain, because dopamine makes you feel good. [8]

However, just because your brain has adapted to motivate you to do something doesn’t mean it’s always good for you. For example, your brain produces higher levels of dopamine when you have chocolate cake than it does for whole-wheat bread. [9] Why? Because 3,000 years ago, high-calorie foods were really hard to come by, so when our ancestors found them, it was important that they eat a whole bunch while the getting was good. [10] These days, a bag of Oreos is only as far as the nearest supermarket. If we gorged on them every chance we got, chances are we’d get heart disease, gain weight, and develop a bunch of other health problems.

Porn is basically sexual junk food. When a person is looking at porn, their brain thinks they’re seeing a potential mating opportunity, and pumps the brain full of dopamine. [11] And unlike healthy sexual relationships that build up over time with an actual person, porn offers an endless stream of hyper-sexual images that flood the brain with high levels of dopamine every time the user clicks to a new image. [12]

Setting your brain up for an overload of feel-good chemicals might sound like a good idea at first, but just like with junk food, what feels like a good thing, in this case isn’t at all. Because porn use floods the brain with high chemical levels, the brain starts to fight back. Over time, the brain will actually cut down on its dopamine receptors—the tiny landing docs that take the dopamine in once it’s been released in your brain. [13] As a result, porn that once excited a person often stops having the same effect, and the user has to look at more porn, look at porn more often, or find a more hardcore version—or all three—to get aroused. [14]

Eventually, as the brain acclimates to the overload of dopamine, users often find that they can’t feel normal without that dopamine high. [15] Little things that used to make them happy, like seeing a friend or playing their favorite sport, can’t compete with the dopamine flood that comes with porn, so they’re left feeling anxious or down until they can get back to it. [16]

On top of that, dopamine doesn’t travel alone. When the brain is getting a hit of dopamine, it’s also getting new pathways built into it with a protein called “iFosB” (pronounced delta fos b). [17]

Essentially, iFosB’s job is to help you remember to do things that feel good or are important. [18] While dopamine is motivating your brain to do things and rewarding it for doing them, iFosB is quietly leaving trail markers in your brain, creating a pathway to help you get back there. [19] When this happens with healthy behaviors, it’s a very good thing. However, as little as one dose of many drugs will also cause iFosB to start building up in the brain’s neurons, and of course porn’s powerful dopamine surge causes iFosB to build up as well. [20]

The more a user looks at porn, the more iFosB accumulates, [21] essentially beating down the brain pathways leading to using, making it easier and easier for the user to turn back to that behavior, whether they want to or not. [22] Eventually, if enough iFosB accumulates, it can “flip a genetic switch,” causing irreversible changes in the brain that leave the user more susceptible to addiction. [23]

And for teens, the risks are especially high, since a teen brain’s reward pathway has a response two to four times more powerful than an adult brain—which means teen brains release even higher levels of dopamine. [24] Teen brains also produce higher levels of iFosB, leaving them extra vulnerable to addiction. [25]

ORIGINAL SOURCE OF THIS ARTICLE:
-http://www.fightthenewdrug.org/porn-is-addictive/#sthash.fukAv5lH.KYSKPfan.dpuf

 

HEY! Pornography IS Addictive!!!

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